The Ideas That Conquered The World

The Ideas That Conquered The World

Michael Mandelbaum, a seasoned political analyst and professor at Johns Hopkins University, is a prolific author. He has produced numerous books of immense imports. This is one of them, to say the least. "The Ideas That Conquered the World," isn't written from the post modern or constructive perspective. He actually mapped out the moments and men who literally forged peace, when the world was bereft of hope.

One of them was President Woodrow Wilson, whose 14 Points, and personal attendance at the League of Nations in France, personally guaranteed its formation. Nor was this the first attempt of creating world peace. Napoleon, in the name of liberty, egality and fraternity, tried it in 1800s with the goal of creating a unified Europe based on nationalism; Metternich of the Austrian Hungarian Empire tried to counter this effort; indeed France and Prussia tried to build an entente to co exist only to fail again in 1871; and the next was World War I and World II.

"The Ideas That Conquered the World," is not a celebration of the mundane. It is a primer on how the US should have, continued on this path to promoting democrats.